Posts tagged #Pasta Flour

hand rolled cavatelli

Transient

One of the best things about having our mill in the back of Pane Bianco is learning from Chef Robbie. Robbie is a walking Larousse Gastronomique, but you wouldn't know it because he likes cooking more than talking about cooking. But if you ever need to identify the odd chili pepper or learn how to cook a strange bean or make pickles that taste like your grandma's-- you should ask Robbie. He cooks as if he's remembering a past life as an Italian Nonna; he knows how things are supposed to be.  And that's why the hand-pulled mozzarella sandwich at Pane Bianco is consistently the most delightful thing your'll ever eat. 

Robbie taught me how to make these cavatelli. How to transform a bit of semolina and '00' flour into beautiful spirals with a simple wooden board. How to keep them light and fluffy. And how to make sure the don't get too thick and chewy.  His advice for perfect cavatelli: "Use your whole thumb." 

And if you attempt to make your own hand rolled cavatelli, this will be the best piece of advice you've ever heard. 

Transient
Transient

Since Robbie's not here to teach us all how to make the perfect cavatelli, here are detailed instructions and pictures of the process. 

  1.  Place your small square of dough at the middle-top of the cavatelli board, then use your thumb to press the dough into the board.
  2. Still pressing your thumb into the board, smear the dough away from the handle. The dough should start to curl up behind your thumb. 
  3. To finish, help the cavatelli roll over on itself, and knock it off the end of the board. 

It will take a few tries to get the hang of it. Mistakes can easily be re-incorporated back into the snake and formed again. 

Transient
Transient
Transient

Hand Rolled Cavatelli

3 cups Heritage Pasta Flour
1 cup + 5 Tablespoons warm water

  1. Measure out the Pasta Flour into a big bowl. Make a indentation in the middle of the flour to hold the water. Pour the water into this indentation and use a fork to slowly incorporate the flour into the pool of water. It will begin to form a ball of dough. Put the dough on a flour-dusted surface and knead vigorously for 5-10 minutes. It should be a smooth ball when you are finished. 
  2. Wrap the dough in plastic and set aside at room temperature to rest for 30 mins - 1 hour. 
  3. Unwrap the rested dough, cut it into 6 sections. Work with one section at a time keeping the rest under the plastic so it doesn't dry out. Shape the dough into a long skinny snake. Using a dough scraper or knife cut the dough-snake into 1 inch sections. 
  4. One-by-one shape the 1 inch sections into cavatelli using the detailed instructions and pictures above. Repeat the process with the remaining 5 sections of dough. 
  5. When you have a great big pile of cavatelli throw them into a well-salted pot of boiling water and cook for 3-5 minutes (divide into 2 or 3 batches if your pot is small).

Cavatelli are great with any red of white sauce. But I love eating them right out of the water, with a drizzle of good olive oil, cracked pepper and a hefty garnish of Parmesan cheese. 

Troubleshoot

+ My dough is too tough? Add another tablespoon water and knead for another 5 minutes. 
+ My cavatelli sticking to the board? Dust your cavatelli board with pasta flour. 
+ My cavatelli are dry in the middle after boiling them? They might be too thick. Try boiling them a few minutes longer. 

Transient
Posted on February 5, 2014 and filed under Dinner, Recipe.

hand-rolled fettuccine

Our family got a really neat Christmas present from the Grandparents: an Italian pasta roller! This is the first time we've made pasta by hand, and we were surprised at how easy it is.

Ingredients:

  • 400g pasta flour
  • 4 eggs
  • a bit of water
  • a bit of extra flour for dusting

It really helps to weigh the flour, but if you don't have a scale, use about 3 cups.

We started off in a bowl as to not make a huge mess, but if you are adventurous, mix everything on a clean countertop. Make a well in the flour for the eggs, then start mixing with a fork until the dough starts to come together.

pasta1.JPG

Now start kneading with your hands.  If it's too sticky, add a bit more flour. If the dough seems crumbly, dip your fingers in water and work that into the dough. When you can set the dough on a clean countertop without sticking, the dough is ready to be shaped into a ball.

Tattoos not required.

Tattoos not required.

Wrap the dough ball in plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes to an hour. This lets the gluten relax so the dough doesn't shrink while you roll it.

Now for the fun part! Split your dough ball into manageable pieces, and roll in your pasta roller. If you don't have a fancy machine, grab a rolling pin and a pizza cutter (learn how here).

rolling rolling rolling

rolling rolling rolling

We chose to use the fettuccine attachment.

pasta4.JPG

When your pasta is the shape you want, dust it with a bit of flour to keep from sticking together, and let them rest and dry for about a half hour before cooking.

For our fettuccine, we paired it with a white wine butter sauce, broccolini and salmon. The light sauce really let the flavor of the pasta shine through.

Whatever you serve your pasta with, be creative and enjoy!

pasta5.JPG
Posted on January 17, 2014 and filed under Dinner, Recipe.

beetroot pasta & pistachio pesto

Sometimes the colors of nature are so incredibly vibrant. Just look at this beet pasta. It's pink. Really really pink. The beet certainly gives this pasta a earthy aroma, but mostly it makes for a very cheerful pasta. Perfect for a special occasion or just the end of a long day.

You don't even need one of those fancy pasta machines, you can do it all with a rolling pin and a pizza wheel and three ingredients.  

Our pasta flour is great for hand rolled pastas, it's the perfect ratio of Golden Durum and White Sonora flour. The durum gives the pasta some bite and the White Sonora gives it a light silkiness. 

volcano doughinprogress doughball

Beetroot Pasta

1 large beet
2 eggs
2 cups  pasta flour, plus more for dusting

1. Wash and chop the ends of the beet off.  Boil it for 30-40 minutes or until soft (test it with a fork, if the fork pierces the skin easily, the beet is done). After it is cooked, drain and peel away the beet skin and coarsely chop.

In a food processor, combine eggs with the chopped beet and pulse until creamy and smooth. Remove any big chunks of beets, as those will tear the pasta dough.

2. Next, pile the pasta flour on a good work surface and shape it into a volcano. Pour the beet mixture into the crater that you just formed in your flour volcano. Use a fork or your hands to slowly combine the flour with the beet mixture. As the dough starts to come together, knead it into a ball, adding more flour if you find that the dough is sticking to your work surface (the beet adds a lot of moisture to this dough, so depending on the size of your particular beet you may find that you have to add in up to 1/4 cup flour to stop the dough from sticking). Cover the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for 30 minutes.

3. After the dough has rested, cut it into 4 sections. Prepare a large work surface by dusting it with pasta flour. Using a rolling pin, roll one section of the dough out flat. But not too thin. It will take a few repetitions of rolling out, dusting with flour and folding, to get the dough prepped. When the dough feels firm, but not too dry, roll it out to the thinness of a dime. Use a sharp knife of pizza wheel to cut thick noodles (don't worry about getting them all the same size, just eyeball it). Separate the noodles and dust with pasta flour to keep from sticking together. 

You can stop here and freeze the pasta for cooking later. Otherwise, boil a stockpot of salted water, add the fresh pasta and boil for 4 minutes.  

Serve with Pistachio Pesto (see recipe below) or any sauce of your choosing.  

 

 

cutpasta noodles thedish

Pistachio Pesto

 3 cups fresh basil leaves
1/2 cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic
1 cup pistachios
Salt and pepper

1. Wash the basil and soak the leaves in cold water for 20 minutes, this removes any bitterness. In a food processor blend the basil while slowly adding in the olive oil. Next add the garlic and pistachios and pulse until smooth but still grainy. Salt and pepper to taste. 

To store for later, refrigerate with a thin layer of olive oil on top of the pesto.  

Posted on October 10, 2013 and filed under Dinner, Recipe.

simple pasta dough

2012-10-24 06.56.38

550 g pasta flour
4 eggs, room temperature (it's no fun to work with your hands if the eggs are too cold)
2 egg yolks
4-6 tbsp tepid water

1. Create a clean workspace on the kitchen counter. Meaure out the flour and dump it out on the counter and form a flour volcano. Just like you do for the gravy at Thanksgiving. This is where the eggs will go. Crack four eggs and two egg yolks into the top of your flour-volcano. The trick is not to let the volcano errupt with egg juice all over the counter. 

2. With a fork or your fingers, very slowly mix the flour into the eggs. Now add the water, it will help the dought come together in a ball. 

3. Knead the dough with the heel of your hand. Push the dough away from you and fold it over. Rotate it 90 degress and repeat.  After about 10 minutes the dough should start to feel silky. 

4. Wrap the dough with plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes. This is when you can scrap the sticky dough bits off the counter and pour yourself a glass of wine. 

5. Give the dogh a poke. Is it firm and springy? Perfect. Now you can turn it into noodles, cavatelli, bowties, or ravoili. 

The best book to get you started is Making Artisan Pasta by Aliza Green 

This is what we use to shape the cavatelli: Beechwood Garganelli Pasta Board. Fantes has so many beautiful pasta making tools. You will want them all. 

Posted on October 25, 2012 and filed under Dinner, Recipe.